1. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    34 minutes ago re: AI Won't Be Biggest Thing Since Sliced Bread -- But WILL Change TV Advertising by by Dave Morgan, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 18)

    Dave, when an advertiser buys TV audience tonnage on a GRP basis---as this is the only way the sellers will guarantee GRP delivery-----this does not necessarily mean that the resulting ad schedule is much more heavily weighted towards frequency. Actually, if the buy follows a sensible plan that takes into account a mix of network types and dayparts, you can come pretty close to the reach and frequency goals you have defined. Also, when I speak of share of voice, I refer to all quintiles, not just the heaviest one. Exceptions aside, if you look at the typical brand's share of TV GRPs in each of the quintiles, in cases where all of the brands use TV in the same manner, the most common outcome is relative parity. This means that most or all of the brands have the same share of GRPs---or approximately so---in each quintile.

    Returning to the frequency issue, if one compares current TV ad schedules with what was true 30 years ago, the main difference is not so much a loss of monthly reach but rather, a more reduced frequency---GRPs. This is a function not only of rating attrition but to a far greater extent of greatly increased costs---or cost per rating point. The typical ad dollar now buys many fewer rating points than before---hence consumers are being "reached" less often by the tyoical TV ad campaign not more frequently..

    I do think that we are on the same page regarding the desirability of improving upon the buying and selling process---if more of the buys are freed from the corporate CPM rules everything trap----but this is a battle that has yet to be won, I'm afraid.

  2. Dave Morgan from Simulmedia
    over 1 hour ago re: AI Won't Be Biggest Thing Since Sliced Bread -- But WILL Change TV Advertising by by Dave Morgan, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 18)

    Great points Larry. Yes. There is no question that AI tools will help marketer buy TV content according to indexes of target audiences who are likely to watch that content. And, more importantly, it will insure that the campaigns can be predictively tuned to optimal reach or frequency, since one problem with buying according to audience indexing is that you tend to end up with high frequency campaigns - continueing to hit the same target members. This is where AI's ability to sort through mathamatically massive amounts of combinations makes a big difference.

  3. Larry Smith from Live Idea
    5 hours ago re: When Influencers Are A Good Influence For The Wrong Reasons by by Cory Treffiletti, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 17)

    Not what you say but how you say it.

  4. Larry Smith from Live Idea
    6 hours ago re: AI Won't Be Biggest Thing Since Sliced Bread -- But WILL Change TV Advertising by by Dave Morgan, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 18)

    "Instead, the industry falls back on defining everything with really simple — and extraordinarily blunt — audience metrics like demographics, gross rating points, networks, days, dayparts and average rating points.”

     

    Forget sliced bread, think bagels with a schmear - buy the content not the audience. What if you could buy programs with high correlation to current customers and lookalikes. Or programs with a high affinity (sentiment, emotion, tone) to the brand position; e.g., your customers love a particular story arc and emotional narrative. (https://goo.gl/WtCoiA)

     

    For example, GoPro cameras and/or Red Bull appeal to risk takers, dreamers, action-oriented, fun loving and creative people. There are lots of tools to understand brand persona and appeal.

     

    Using a variety of AI tools (IBM Watson, Identv, Graymatics) every video could be analyzed and clustered according to attributes like sentiment, tone, concepts, entities, keywords, and more. AI would find patterns in the types of programming that are consistent with the brand position and over time determine which program attributes are key to engagement.

     

  5. Dave Morgan from Simulmedia
    11 hours ago re: AI Won't Be Biggest Thing Since Sliced Bread -- But WILL Change TV Advertising by by Dave Morgan, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 18)

    Ed, great points. I totally agree about the share of voice argurment. However, what I should have been clearer about is that it is not fragmentation that creates heavy frequency buys, it is buying on large average rating points that creates frequency heavy campaigns in a fragemtned world. Owning share of voice is great, but it's not so great if you only own it with one quintil of TV viewershp. That is what is happening today.

  6. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 7:13 PM re: Oprah Winfrey For President? Heaven Help Us by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - Jan. 18)

    Seems like more people are talking about her running that she is. 

  7. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 6:37 PM re: AI Won't Be Biggest Thing Since Sliced Bread -- But WILL Change TV Advertising by by Dave Morgan, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 18)

    Dave, I agree with you about the hyping of AI. Hoewver the fact that the vast majority of TV show airings are now low rated---due to the huge number of competing channels----does not necessarily corelate with excessive frequency. The basic reason why most TV shows now earn very low per-telecast ratings is because those who sample them watch them less often---not more often.

    That said, we should, perhaps, redefine what we mean by "waste" when thinking about audience tonnage ---or "impressions". The plain fact is that 20% of all adults consume about half of all TV content, while, at the opposite end of the TV spectrum, another "quintile" accounts for barely 3-4%. The former are mostly older consumers and are heavily oriented to low brow groupings by education. income, etc. This makes them "less desirable", although not worthless targets for many advertisers. But the key point is the fact that in most cases all of the competing brands in a given category use the same media---with TV as their mainstay. Consequently, most brands' TV schedules contain a lot of "wasted" impressions. Which usually means that what really counts, aside from the product positioning and creative execution of the ads, is share of voice. If your brand has an overall share of TV ad impressions for its category of 10%, chances are that it will be in this approximate position an all of the TV quinties---heaviest viewing to lightest. And, in most cases its share of sales will not vary that much either. It is possible to verify whether this is or is not the case via Simmons or MRI. In order to reconfigure TV GRP weight so the lighter---younger/upscale----consumer gets more impressions, you must accept that you will sacrifice impressions---and share of voice---among the heaviest viewing group. Whether this is a good or bad idea, varies from advertiser to advertiser but there is no solid evidence that the trade-off---losing three to five heavy viewer impressions for every one gained among light viewers--- always pays out in ROI.

    I happen to believe in better targeting methods---when they are people, not household based---- and would like to see a system where advertisers allocate part of their TV spending to massive, broadly targeted corporate upfront CPM-driven buys as an efficiency hedge, but also place some of their money purchases in a brand-specific upfront as well as scatter deals. Here we would see to what extent real improvements could be made, though even the most refined targeting techniques will, no doubt garner more GRPs against those ever present heavy viewers.

  8. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 4:59 PM re: AI Won't Be Biggest Thing Since Sliced Bread -- But WILL Change TV Advertising by by Dave Morgan, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Jan. 18)

    Thought the share/hut for a rating was crap when there was only 4 stations. Even with more "sophistication",...follow the money. Maybe AI will help, maybe it won't and get lost in a larger fray. Can't buy intuition and paying attention.

  9. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 3:53 PM re: 'The Awl' Shutters After Nearly A Decade Of Publishing by by Melynda Fuller (Publishing Insider - Jan. 18)

    Some of these smaller publications must coordinate and combine in order to survive whether you want you little special corner or not, there is no choice.

  10. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 3:48 PM re: Report: Data, Research Key Elements In Winning New Business Pitches by by Larissa Faw (MAD - Jan. 18)

    So the advertisers "expect" the agencies to conduct prior "primary research" ---at the agencies' expense----as part of thier new business soliticitations. And, this "freebie" research would be done without any input from the would-be new client. That's rich. Next, the agencies would probably be asked to develop new positioning strategies and possible ad executions---again at their expense and without any guarantee that their ideas wouldn't be "stolen"---or "borrowed"---even if they don't get the account. Where have I heard all of this before?

  11. Chuck Lantz from 2007ac.com, 2017ac.com network
    Yesterday, 3:46 PM re: 'The Awl' Shutters After Nearly A Decade Of Publishing by by Melynda Fuller (Publishing Insider - Jan. 18)

    I would be remiss in my sworn duties as a Metaphor Constable if I didn't offer a suitable replacement.  here it is; ... "The Awl, the scrappy independent news and pop culture website that filled the vacuum left by Gawker’s demise."

  12. Chuck Lantz from 2007ac.com, 2017ac.com network
    Yesterday, 2:09 PM re: 'The Awl' Shutters After Nearly A Decade Of Publishing by by Melynda Fuller (Publishing Insider - Jan. 18)

    Rising "from Gawker's ashes" makes it sound as if The Awl was founded by those left adrift when Gawker was shuttered after the lawsuit, which is not the case. 

  13. Dan Greenberg from Impossible Software, GmbH
    Yesterday, 1:38 PM re: Lawmakers Blast FCC's Mobile Broadband Proposal by by Wendy Davis (Digital News Daily - Jan. 17)

    The legislators want things both ways. They make the argument that wireless is bad because stable broadband is needed for telemedicine... but then argue for wireline net neutrality (which makes stable wireline broadband an all-or-none and, given the cost, likely unworkable alternative). There's just a fundamental lack of understanding of economics behind this position.

  14. Jon Currie from Currie Communications, Inc.
    Yesterday, 12:53 PM re: Oprah Winfrey For President? Heaven Help Us by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - Jan. 18)

    Interestingly, you've often given Trump a free pass, yet somehow Oprah comes in as a source for parody. And by the way, following on your logic, Springer cannot be President as he was born in London, as in England.

  15. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 12:49 PM re: With Opioid Disposal, Walmart Takes Another Step Toward Wellness by by Sarah Mahoney (Marketing Daily - Jan. 17)

    Sounds like a winner for what it is. Speaking of that, what is the safety and the precausions of the compound itself and the same when mixed with water ? Would be nice to know more about the chemical process of this in simple terms.

  16. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 11:15 AM re: How Will Advertisers Deal With Trending 'Waxy Monkey?' by by Larissa Faw (MAD - Jan. 17)

    The Pied Piper strikes again.

  17. Roman Onischuk from Proofy.io
    Yesterday, 4:55 AM re: Retailers Are Trying to Cope With Online Threat: Report by by Ray Schultz (Email Marketing Daily - Jan. 16)

    For retailers this paragraph

    "The report shows that email marketing was tested in the past year by 52% of retailers, compared to direct or shared mail (55%) and in-store signage (55%). " 

    is the biggest argument, because of email software (outreach, remail.io, woodpecker.co) help this person growth their follow-ups and sales.

    I like read mediapost, nice resource

  18. Richard Hunter from AdEx
    Yesterday, 4:11 AM re: Red, White & Bizarro by by Joe Mandese (Red, White & Blog - Jan. 17)

    As someone who lived in NYC for many years and also constantly read about Trump in the Post and Daily News (and also having known some who worked for him and Ivana at the Plaza), I was also dismayed at the gullability of so many of the public taking him at what he says.
    But then, you and I forget that the nature of politics, or at least American politicians, is to lie - you do not get elected by telling the Truth.  I reference President Obama: "If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor", or everyone will see a "$2,500 reduction in their health insurance".  And let's be honest, you actually believe Hilliary, or Bill, or Chelsea, regarding the Clinton Foundation, and that there was no quid pro quo for the millions poured into the slush fund by "donors"?  And to take it one step further, you honestly believe that the leadership in the DNC treated Sanders "democratically'?
    A truism in politics: Your first task is to get elected, once elected your second task is to get reelected. Elected and reelected by YOUR contituents and primarily by those who voted for you.
    A pox on all their houses.
    But what Trump has done, and how he got elected, is by being himself, and the vast heartland in the United States were fed up with platitudes and being lectured my elites in the Government and Media as to how evil we are, and that we owe the world an apology for being instrumental in spreading Democracy (yes we also propped up despots - but that is the nature of global politics, just look at the ineffectiveness of the UN).
    Unless the Democrates and Republicans come to their senses and quit ignoring the voice to the "deplorables", we may unfortunately be reminded of Jeffersons statement regarding fertilizing the "Tree of Liberty".

  19. Roman Onischuk from Proofy.io
    Yesterday, 3:08 AM re: Are Your Subscribers Hooked On Your Marketing Program? by by George Bilbrey, Op-Ed Contributor (Email Marketing Daily - Jan. 16)

    A really nice article, I've bought this book yesterday, and I use your advice which described in this paragraph:

    "-- Social proof: Show that other customer have taken the action with great results.

    -- Curiosity: Leave out the punchline. Provide a question without an answer.
    -- Gifting: Providing a free gift is a proven motivator.
    -- Humor: Quirkiness (with a promise of more humor to be had after the click) can be a strong incentive to action.
    -- Loss aversion: If users may lose something of value (e.g, airline status, a discount coupon) if they don’t take an action, this can be a strong motivator.

    -- A great source of potential motivators can be found at the Mental Notes site. " 
    this system works for me and my customers by email campaign from remail.io.

  20. John Grono from GAP Research
    Yesterday, 2:30 AM re: Sponsorship Spending Expected To Rise In 2018 by by Tanya Gazdik (Marketing Daily - Jan. 17)

    Thank you Tanya,   That makes sense now.

  21. Tanya Gazdik from MediaPost
    Yesterday, 12:59 AM re: Sponsorship Spending Expected To Rise In 2018 by by Tanya Gazdik (Marketing Daily - Jan. 17)

    The total with the increase was $23.1 billion. I've changed "or" to "to." Hopefully that makes more sense. Thanks for the question. 

  22. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 8:40 PM re: Trump's Fake News Awards - Should We Include His Tweets? by by Wayne Friedman, Staff Writer (TV Watch - Jan. 17)

    Could you just throw buckets of water on him and see if he melts ?

  23. Chuck Martin from Chuck Martin
    Yesterday, 7:49 PM re: AI, IoT Driving Tech Spending To $3.7 Trillion This Year, Says Gartner by by Chuck Martin (AI & IoT Daily - Jan. 17)

    Right, Mark, but new jobs will have to be created as well.